England Council

Our England Council works on behalf of people living with MS in England.

Council members work alongside the staff team in England, as well as with our local groups, to stop MS.

The Council is ultimately accountable to our Board of Trustees.

Our England Council meets in our National Centre offices. Meetings (with the exception of occasional confidential items) are open to MS Society members – you just need to register at least two weeks in advance by emailing englandcouncil@mssociety.org.uk or calling 020 8438 0757. Our meeting dates for 2019 are:

  • 1 August 2019
  • 24 October 2019

What it's like to be on our England Council

Philip is our England Council Chair. In this video he tells us about his passion for the role. Read about volunteering with us

Meet our England Council members

Phillip Gamble (Lancs and S Cumbria) Chair

I first became aware of the MS Society after my wife was diagnosed 22 years ago.

During my time here I’ve been a group coordinator, regional vice chair, regional treasurer and area treasurer.

We’re a volunteer-led organisation and I’m proud to be part of our greatest strength, the volunteers. A highlight of my role is getting to meet so many of the volunteers who tirelessly assist all those affected by MS.

Jackie Mumby (Yorkshire) Vice Chair

I’ve been aware of MS since childhood through a close friend of the family, and I’ve helped fundraise over many years. I was diagnosed with MS 9 years ago at the age of 29.

Since diagnosis I’ve been involved on a local level as an assistant treasurer and committee member. I view the England council as a vital link between those with MS, trustees and members of staff.

I’ve gained many friends through the MS Society’s local networks and would like to be able to help many others like myself.

image shows council member David Kozlowski

David Kozlowski (North of England)

I’m married with two teenage children and live in Windermere in the Lake District.

I was originally diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS but transitioned to secondary progressive MS in 2013. At that point I had to stop working. I know first-hand the impact disability can have on employability and the dramatic effect it can have on the family.

I’m keen to push for improvements in medicine, diagnostics, treatment and care of those affected by MS.

image shows council member John Pullen

John Pullin (Kent)

My father was diagnosed with MS just before I was born. As a child I became one of his carers before he died as a result of the condition.

I trained to be a general nurse and began my long career in the NHS. In 1990 I was diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS, but I’ve been able to live a full life. I understand from a professional basis the importance of high quality care.

I also understand what it’s like from carer’s perspective, recognising the pressure that MS puts on individuals. And I know first hand what it’s like to live with MS.

image shows council member Lynda Tubbs

Lynda Tubbs (South West)

I’ve lived with relapsing remitting MS for twelve years. I was granted early retirement from my employment as a primary school teacher within two years of diagnosis. I’ve served on the committee of my local group and also worked as a volunteer tutor with the Expert Patients Programme. This involved working with groups of people living with long-term conditions including MS.

As a committee member I’ve been an enthusiastic fundraiser attending variety of events in my local community to raise funds for the MS Society and awareness of MS.

As a council member I’m keen to use my skills to work with branches, staff and everyone affected by MS.

image shows council member David Allen

David Allen (Herts, Essex & Beds)

I was diagnosed with primary progressive MS in 1996. Having to give up work I understand the many issues people living with MS face, including family members and carers.

During my time as chair of the Luton Dunstable & District group I successfully developed a self-sustaining model for exercise classes.

My experience of social care and the benefits system, both good and bad, means I’m passionate about doing my bit to help bring about change for a fairer system.

I consider it a privilege and honour to serve on the England Council.

Dom Thorpe (London)

I grew up with my mum who was an MS Warrior. She lived with MS for a number of years before she died in 2012. This led me to embark on a career helping people with MS improve their lives through health and fitness.

I started in 2008 and by then my mum’s condition had progressed to the point where it was too late to help her with exercise. But ever since, it’s been my mission to help others in similar situations.

I’ve recently worked with the MS Society to create and star in a series of fitness videos.

image shows council member Peter Hicks

Peter Hicks (Hants & Islands)

I first became aware of MS when my late wife’s uncle was diagnosed with MS in the 1970s. When my wife was also diagnosed with MS in 1998 I became her carer, and retired in 2005 to become her main carer. Since her death in 2013, I’ve been a member of my local group as a committee member and fundraiser.

I’m now the Group Coordinator. I’m working with some amazing people, whose tireless dedication to helping people with MS is truly amazing I’m also involved with Carers UK as a local Ambassador.

I want to use my experience and knowledge to move forward and seek the best possible future for people living with MS.

image shows council member Eve Darwood

Eve Darwood (East Midlands)

I was diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS in 2014. Since then I’ve worked towards improving understanding and awareness of MS.

In 2017 I completed a Master’s degree and I’m beginning a PhD study exploring the ways in which blogs, poetry and prose can narrate the experience of life with MS.

I’m a Chair of Governors in a local school and have experience of strategic action planning, developing volunteers.

I completed the Great North Swim across Lake Windermere in 2015 to raise funds for the MS Society, The work of the MS Society is vital in bringing together the voices and needs of all who live with MS, and I want to use my experience and skills to contribute to this.

image shows council member Marie Cullen

Marie Cullen (East Anglia)

I’ve had MS for 29 years and I’m a volunteer for South East Central Group and hold many titles.

I’ve run an exercise class with people with MS and have successfully handed over this project to the local doctor’s practice. I help people with MS find the right services, help with paperwork and act as an advocate for those who cannot communicate due to speech problems.

I have 4 children, one of whom is disabled.

I work full time and have a team around me to keep my MS in check.

image shows council member Tamla Willie

Tamla Willie (Wessex & West)

I have relapsing remitting MS, or as like to say, I’m an MSer!

I’m proud to be on the England Council and represent those with MS and affected by MS in my local community.

My role involves listening to the views of people with MS and making sure I have a good understanding of their opinions and needs. I then bring this to the council and share information with local MSers to keep them properly informed of developments.

Become a National Council member

We are looking for new volunteers to join our national councils. Our volunteers are the backbone of the MS Society and you would be joining a highly committed team of everyday superheroes who are helping our vision become a reality.

You can apply for our national council vacancies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.