Photo: Girl wearing hijab sits with her father who has MS looking at a laptop computerPhoto: Girl wearing hijab sits with her father who has MS looking at a laptop computer

MS and technology

Technology has dramatically changed everyone's lives, people with MS included. From how we shop, to how we interact with each other and access information - technology and data increasingly empower us and personalise the services we use.

In this report with the Nuffield Trust, we look at how new technologies are already helping people with MS. And where there's scope for them to do more.

We’ve also made an action plan explaining how we'll work with partners to make technology work for everyone affected by MS. We've identified four areas with particular potential, scroll down to find out more.

Gif: shows different sections of the report as a circle with people with MS in the middle. Written content reproduced below.

More control over care

  • New digital tools produced with people affected by MS so they work for them
  • Interactive digital information makes it easy to find what people need and make decisions
  • It’s easier for people to compare options and learn from each other online

Accessible and coordinated care

  • Data shared between services means people don’t have to remember and repeat themselves
  • Digital care planning and coordination helps professionals and patients to act as one team
  • People with MS are confident their data will be used appropriately when they share it

Services that better meet need

  • Health services use existing data to understand what people with MS need and provide the right support
  • Audits help with comparing services and drive improvement through shared learning
  • Planning is improved through new data focussed on what matters to people with MS

The right treatment at the right time

  • Treatment outcomes reflect what matters to people with MS and help them make the right decisions for them
  • Increased data collection strengthens knowledge of what treatment works best for different people
  • Automated collection and analysis of outcomes means richer data for clinicians and researchers