Targeting activin receptors to promote myelin repair

Dr Veronique Miron,

University of Edinburgh,

£297,000

About the project

Myelin is made by specialised cells known as oligodendrocytes, which are found within the central nervous system. Myelin repair involves stem cells in the brain that multiply and generate new oligodendrocytes. As MS progresses, the myelin repair process becomes less efficient and damage accumulates, meaning that nerves don't function properly.

This project will explore the role of a molecule called activin-A which has been found to be present in the brain during myelin repair. Stem cells in the brain have activin receptors that when activated in laboratory studies multiply and produce more oligodendrocytes. The researchers will be looking to understand further how activin receptors control stem cell behaviour. This will reveal how important activin receptors are, and could pave the way towards new strategies that encourage myelin repair in MS.

How will it help people with MS?

This research aims to uncover the importance of activin receptors for stem cells in driving myelin repair. This is knowledge which could be implemented in the development of new therapies to slow the worsening of disability that results from nerve damage in MS.This research aims to uncover the importance of activin receptors for stem cells in driving myelin repair. This is knowledge which could be implemented in the development of new therapies to slow the worsening of disability that results from nerve damage in MS.

The difference you can make

There are currently no strategies to slow progression in MS. Supporting research like this helps to bring us closer to reaching this goal.


Make a donation to help stop MS

The next research breakthrough is in reach. Your donation will help stop MS.

  • Please enter an amount

    Our minimum donation is £2, please enter a different amount.

£10could buy vital lab supplies for MS researchers, helping them find ways to stop MS faster

£20could pay for lab equipment like petri dishes to grow bacteria important for studying the genetics of MS

£30could process one blood sample, giving us crucial information about genes that could lead to treatment breakthroughs

Every penny you give really does take us a step closer to stopping MS. Your donation will make a difference.

  • Please enter an amount

    Our minimum donation is £2, please enter a different amount.

£10a month could pay for lab equipment like microscope slides to study the building blocks of MS

£20a month could pay for lab equipment like petri dishes to grow bacteria important for studying genetics

£30a month could process a blood sample to help us understand what causes MS, so we can stop it in its tracks

Your regular donation means we can keep funding world class MS research with confidence. Together we will stop MS.

Young girl in hospital ward talking to male nurse