Community blog

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Stories for people affected by MS, by people affected by MS.

MS is different for everyone - read real stories and tips from people who know.

Latest entries

Christopher's blog - the 'progressive' word

The 'progressive' part of 'primary progressive multiple sclerosis' has been very much in my mind recently.

Mike's blog - the bladder and MS

Many MS symptoms are visible. These are the more obvious ones, and highlight to anyone who might be watching that something’s not quite right. They are annoying and frustrating and, like us, they are all different and require different levels of attention.

Andrew's blog - The Inexpert Patient

1. In defence of ignorance

‘I wouldn’t bother with the MS websites if I were you.’ 

Trevis's blog - speaking of MS

“My name is Trevis Gleason and I live with Multiple Sclerosis.”

I’ve started countless speeches with that opening line. From small gatherings of people living with the disease to, in the case of recent events, fundraising luncheons attended by over a thousand.

Donna's blog - to wheelchair, or not to wheelchair?

"This month’s MS Matters drops through the door. I start to flick through it, hmm ... the first page is an advert for ‘Powerchairs’. I put it on the recycling pile.

Louise's blog - Gilenya vs Betaferon

Kerry's blog - my little machine

Kerry is 29 years old and was diagnosed in 2005.

Michael's blog - life as a husband, father, carer and student!

Michael is 32 and his wife Julie has secondary progressive MS. They have a daughter, Alice Rose, who is 2 years old.

Welcome to my first blog. I thought I’d start by sharing some details about myself and what I hope to get out of writing a blog for you.

Julie's blog - looking on the bright side

Hello all!

My name is Julie, I’m 31 and I have secondary progressive MS. I’ve been in a wheelchair for about a year now. Still haven’t mastered the wheelie yet but there is time.

Gillian's blog - MS and the elephant in the room

"I’m sure all of our experiences of MS are as unique as the disease itself. As someone who was newly diagnosed, I found that people were often a little uncomfortable around me during that first acute relapse.

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