NICE issues draft CCSVI guidance

Published date: 25 Aug 2011 at 10:14AM

NICE (National Institute for Healthcare and Clinical Excellence) have issued draft guidance on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI).

The guidance, published today and now open for public comment, states that more research into CCSVI is needed. 

The guidance also recommends that treatment for CCSVI should not take place outside of a properly controlled clinical trial.

Professor Bruce Campbell, Chair of the independent committee that develops NICE’s Interventional Procedures guidance said:

"….it is really important to find out whether percutaneous venoplasty is clinically effective and safe for use in the NHS. Based on the existing evidence, we believe that clinicians should only consider offering percutaneous venoplasty as a treatment option for people with MS who fit the diagnostic criteria for CCSVI, as part of structured clinical trials.

"In particular, we would welcome controlled research comparing percutaneous venoplasty against “sham venoplasty”, in the same way that drug treatments are compared to a placebo. This is so that we can learn more about whether venoplasty works and for how long. Further research could also improve the understanding of the relationship between MS and CCSVI, as this is very unclear at present”.

A consultation will now open until 21 September and people with MS have been invited by NICE to offer feedback.

Dr Doug Brown, Head of Biomedical Research at the MS Society, said: “We welcome the call for further research into the link between MS and CCSVI.  The MS Society is part of an international effort to speed up research into this area and there are currently a number of studies and clinical trials ongoing world-wide – the outcomes of which will be pivotal in determining what direction future research should take.”

Read NICE's guidance

Page last updated: 29 Mar 2012
Based on the existing evidence, we believe that clinicians should only consider offering percutaneous venoplasty as a treatment option for people with MS who fit the diagnostic criteria for CCSVI, as part of structured clinical trials.
Professor Bruce Campbell, Chair of Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme at NICE
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