Glossary beginning with S

Click on of the letters below to advance the page to terms beginning with that letter.
You can search for an item with the icon.
Sativex

Sativex is a cannabis-based oral spray licensed for the treatment of spasticity in people with MS. At present, it is only available on the NHS in Wales.

More on this topic
Scottish Medicines Consortium

The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) provides advice about medicines to NHS Scotland. The SMC appraises new medicines independently of NICE in England.

More on this topic
Secondary progressive MS

This is a type of MS that many people with relapsing remitting MS go on to develop. If someone's MS symptoms have become progressively worse over a period of at least six months, they can be said to have moved on to secondary progressive MS. Some people continue to have relapses in addition to progressive deterioration, while others don't.

More on this topic
Self-management courses

Self-management courses help people who are living with a long-term health condition to manage their condition better on a daily basis.

More on this topic
Serotonin

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter. It is a chemical signal that transmits information from one nerve to another. Lowered levels of serotonin in the brain are linked to depression. Drugs like fluoxetine work by raising serotonin back to normal levels.

More on this topic
Sex hormones

It is well established that females are more susceptible to relapsing remitting MS than males. In addition, the frequency of relapses reduces by up to 70 per cent during pregnancy, particularly late stages of pregnancy. These observations have led researchers to investigate the role of the gender-specific hormones estriol (a pregnancy hormone) and testosterone (a male hormone) in reducing relapses in MS. Current studies are being done to investigate the effects of these hormones on relapses in MS.

More on this topic
Side effects

Side effects are unwanted symptoms caused by a medical treatment. All treatments can have side effects, but not everyone who takes the treatment will have these side effects. With all treatments, it can be a case of weighing the benefits against possible side effects and finding the best compromise. Over time, you and your doctor or MS nurse might make adjustments to the drugs you use or the dose you take, to find the best for you.

More on this topic
Significance

If a result in a test or trial is significant, this means that a statistical analysis has been carried out to show the result is unlikely to have occurred by chance, and is therefore likely to be due to the treatment given.

More on this topic
Simvastatin

Simvastatin was originally developed to help lower cholesterol levels. It has also been studied for its ability to decrease the number of lesions and reduce inflammation in people with MS. A phase 2 clinical trial of simvastatin in people with secondary progressive MS reported that the drug might slow disability progression.

More on this topic
Smoking

There is now a body of evidence that smoking could be a risk factor for developing MS. It's not yet clear exactly why this is, although one theory is that the chemicals in cigarette smoke affect the immune system. A study has shown that cigarette smoking worsens the motor functions (transfer of nerve impulses to muscles) in people with MS, when compared to people who do not have MS.

More on this topic
Spasticity

Spasticity describes a tightness or stiffness in the muscles, which can make it difficult to move the affected muscles. It is a common symptom of MS.

More on this topic
Speech and language therapist

Speech and language therapists can diagnose, assist and treat speech and swallowing problems. Your MS nurse or GP can refer you.

More on this topic
Statutory sick pay

Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) is paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks if you are too ill to work. It can be paid if you have been off work sick for 4 or more days in a row (including non-working days).

More on this topic
Stem cell therapy

Stem cell therapy is any treatment that uses or targets stem cells. This is usually to replace or repair damaged cells or tissue, but can also be used to prevent damage from happening in the first place. There is a potential to use stem cells to grow different new nerve cells, but research into stem cells is still at the very early stages. The MS Society supports all types of stem cell research.

More on this topic
Stem cells

Most cells in the body can only do one job, for example, a skin cell can never become a brain cell. Stem cells however, have the potential to become other types of cell, such as cells in the muscles, blood or brain.

More on this topic
Steroids

Steroids - also called corticosteroids - are used to treat relapses. They can help to reduce inflammation and speed up recovery. They are synthetic versions of natural hormones found in the body.

More on this topic
Support plan

If you have been assessed as needing support from social care services, you and your social worker will agree a support plan. This is a personalised guide to the money, services and equipment identified in your assessment.

More on this topic
Supportive listening

Supportive listening is a treatment that helps people find their own solutions by talking through experiences, thoughts and feelings in a non-judgmental listening environment.

More on this topic

What's new?