Glossary beginning with L

Click on of the letters below to advance the page to terms beginning with that letter.
You can search for an item with the icon.
L'Hermitte's sign

A sudden, electric-shock-like sensation, that spreads into the arms or legs, often triggered when the neck is bent forward, or after a cough or sneeze.

More on this topic
Lamotrigine

Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant drug commonly used to treat epilepsy. It is known as a sodium channel blocker because it can block sodium molecules from entering cells. It is currently in phase 2 clinical trials for secondary progressive MS to examine its neuroprotective effects.

More on this topic
Laquinimod

Laquinimod was a drug developed to treat relapsing remitting MS. It did not receive a licence due to disappointing trial results.

More on this topic
Lasting Power of Attorney

A lasting power of attorney (LPA) is a legal document that lets you appoint people who can make decisions on your behalf if you become unable to do so. The two types of LPA cover 'health and welfare' and 'property and financial affairs'. In England and Wales it has replaced the 'enduring power of attorney'. There is a different process in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

More on this topic
LDN

Naltrexone is licensed in the UK to help treat people who are addicted to opiates, such as heroin. Some research suggests that when naltrexone is given at low doses ('Low-dose naltrexone' or LDN), it may have an anti-inflammatory effect that could be beneficial in the treatment of MS. Currently there is not enough evidence-based information to prove LDN is an effective treatment for MS and it is not licensed for the treatment of MS in the UK.

More on this topic
Lemtrada

Lemtrada is the brand name for alemtuzumab, a licensed treatment for active relapsing remitting MS. It has also been known as Campath.

More on this topic
Lesion

In MS, lesions are patches of inflammation in the brain and spinal cord. Some lesions will spontaneously repair themselves and disappear. Others become permanent areas of visible scarring, known as plaques.

More on this topic
Licensed treatment

A treatment that has been deemed safe and effective, and can be prescribed for use in people with a specific condition or symptom. In the UK the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) decides what treatments can been licensed.

More on this topic
Lingo-1

Lingo-1 is an antibody designed to regenerate myelin that is being developed as a potential therapy for MS. A phase 1 study found the treatment to be safe to use in healthy volunteers. The drug will now be tested in phase 2 trials which will investigate the safety of the treatment in a larger group of people with MS.

More on this topic
Living will

An 'advance directive' (also called an 'advance decision' or 'living will') allows you to refuse a specific medical treatment some time in the future, should you lose the capacity or ability to communicate your wishes regarding that treatment.

More on this topic
Low-dose naltrexone

Naltrexone is licensed in the UK to help treat people who are addicted to opiates, such as heroin. Some research suggests that when naltrexone is given at low doses ('Low-dose naltrexone' or LDN), it may have an anti-inflammatory effect which could be helpful in treating MS. However, there is currently not enough evidence to prove LDN is an effective treatment for MS and it is not licensed for the treatment of MS in the UK.

More on this topic
Lumbar puncture

A lumbar puncture is one of the standard tests that is used to diagnose MS. People with MS often have antibodies in the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. These antibodies are a sign that the immune system has been active in the central nervous system. The procedure used to get a sample of this fluid is called a lumbar puncture. It involves inserting a needle into the space around the spinal cord and drawing out fluid.

More on this topic
Lymph glands

Lymph glands or nodes are small bean-shaped glands located throughout the body that form part of the immune system. White blood cells multiply in these nodes in response to an infection. This is why lymph glands become swollen at the site of an infection.

More on this topic
Lymph nodes

Lymph nodes are small bean-shaped glands located throughout the body that form part of the immune system. White blood cells multiply in these nodes in preparation for an immune response. This is why lymph glands become swollen at the site of an infection.

More on this topic

What's new?